The Best is Yet to Come

Peninsula Community Church

The Best is Yet to Come

May 13, 2018 

Romans 8:18-25 For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us. For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the sons of God. For the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly, but because of him who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to corruption and obtain the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation has been groaning together in the pains of childbirth until now. And not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption of our bodies. For in this hope we were saved. Now hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes for what he sees? But if we hope for what we do not see, we wait for it with patience.

A number of years ago I did the funeral for a lady in our church. In preparing for the service, the family had requested that at the end of the service I would place a fork in the casket before they closed it. When I asked them why, they stated that their mom loved dessert. When she would clear the table after dinner, she would always say “keep your fork because the best is yet to come.” What she meant was that dessert was on the way and for her that was always the best part of the meal. As we review this passage, we find Paul saying there is much that happens in life, but the best is yet come. 

With that understanding let us consider a couple of important truths. Paul begins Romans 8:18 with the word “consider” which means to make a numerical calculation. It means to reckon, compute, calculate, to take into account, to deliberate, and to weigh. The idea is one of careful study or reasoning which results in coming to a specific conclusion. So what is the specific conclusion Paul wants us to consider? It is this. Paul is saying I have weighed out the trials I am experiencing now and I have weighed out the glory that is to be revealed and what I found is that the glory to come far outweighs any problems associated with my present condition. Paul has “mentally and spiritually weighed” the evidence and has come to the conclusion that something better is coming and that brings him hope.

As we read this passage, we find that the word suffer is pluralized which means of course that there is more than one problem. Have you ever noticed that when problems come there is usually not just a singular problem but they seem to come in multiples? The point is that in life we will have sufferings. We will have problems, multiple problems. Our heart will be broken. We will sense the pain of sorrow and difficult issues which seem almost unresolvable. We will be confronted by health issues that blindside us. Our children and other family members will disappoint us and fall short of the potential we believe they have. There will be arguments, fights, and issues will arise that seem impossible to overcome. We will have sufferings.

Secondly, Paul clarifies that he is looking at the sufferings we face in the present time. He calls it “present sufferings.” Paul is saying this is not the suffering of the past. It is not some future suffering we may face. It is what we are going through right now. There have been some that I speak with that share their pain and suffering. When you dig into their story, you find that the problems they are discussing occurred sometime in the past, and yet they share the problem as if it is a current issue. The problem most often is that their past problems have begun to define who they are in the present. You may be divorced, but divorce does not have to define you. You may have had serious sin issues in the past, but that does not have to define you now. Get the point. There are others times that we are perplexed by future issues that may or may not even occur. We spend an exorbitant amount of time worrying over what may never happen. In this regard, I love the words of Jesus in Matthew 6:34. Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble. Jesus understood that we have enough to worry about today, so there is no reason to be concerned about past issues or future problems.

Thirdly, Paul states that whatever we go through now, no matter how great or painful they are, they cannot be compared to the glory that is to be revealed. That future glory has not been revealed, yet, but it is coming. In other words, be patient and hold on. Just as the mom, who could not wait for dessert, would proclaim the best is yet to come, the glory that is to come also reminds us that the best is yet to come for us. Yes, we have problems, but the best is yet to come. One problem we encounter is that we are impatient. We want things now. We do not want to wait. We want instant healing. We want growth without pain. We want advancement without hard work. We want instant gratification and instant results. We are impatient people.

Paul lets us in on a secret in 1 Corinthians 2:9-10. He states, But, as it is written, “What no eye has seen, nor ear heard, nor the heart of man imagined, what God has prepared for those who love him”— these things God has revealed to us through the Spirit. For the Spirit searches everything, even the depths of God. God knows what you are going through this morning, and the best is yet to come.

Dr. R.C. Sproul writes in his commentary on Romans that The difference between the present degree of pain we experience and the blessedness to which God has appointed His people is so immensely different that there is no way to compare them. Any comparison we come up with falls short. When you are discouraged by your troubles, know that what is to come for you in Christ will be so much more wonderful than all of your pain. We see this in Paul’s letter to the Corinthian church. … we do not lose heart. Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal (2 Corinthians 4:16-18).

Paul stated that For in this hope we were saved. Now hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes for what he sees? But if we hope for what we do not see, we wait for it with patience. Think about this. Paul is saying that hope is always in the unseen. That is why it is hope. Hope that sees the future is not hope at all. For that reason, God gives calls to hope in the glory that is to come, and not in the difficulties we face in this moment of time. In life, we face two great paradoxes: the futility of suffering and the hope of suffering. Paul does not minimize the suffering we face. In fact, Paul knew better than anyone what it meant to suffer for Christ. He knew what it meant to be beaten and be left for dead. He knew what it meant to be sick. He knew what it meant to pray for healing, but healing did not come. He knew what it meant to be betrayed by those close to him. He knew all of this and yet he could express such a hope in a future glory, because His hope was not in the circumstances or the events he faced. He had a “yet to come” perspective. 

In this matter, there are two things to consider in regard to the coming glory of Christ. One is that God’s glory is revealed on the earth, and second His full glory will not be experienced until we go to be with Christ in heaven. Perhaps, it would be helpful to understand the word “glory.” Glory has been defined as the manifestation of God’s presence. Here on earth there are moments when God’s presence is revealed in powerful ways, but His full glory comes when He brings us home with Him and we get to live in His presence for eternity. 

As humans, we experience pain in different ways. This is evident most often in the questions we ask. One of the great questions that is poised by so many of us is “How much more can I bear?” “What else is going to happen to me or them?” “Why is this happening?” “Why is this happening now?” “How am I going to make it through this?” “Why me?” “Why them?” And on and on go the questions. 

When we realize that the best is yet to come, we can endure the difficulties of the present time. The result is that we will have hope and we will be focused on a greater day and a greater opportunity for the presence of God to be manifested. So in the end, this all comes back to where our focus will be. Will we focus on the present problems, or the coming glory of God? Will we focus on the difficulties we face, or the promise that the best is yet to come? 

So where is your focus? Remember Paul started this chapter with the statement that “there is therefore now no condemnation in Christ Jesus.” When we are focused on eternity and the coming glory of God, we are less likely to be condemned by the our current circumstances, because our hope is in Christ. So what are you going through? Do you need some dessert? Keep your fork because the best is yet to come. How many are facing some difficult times right now? Who needs some dessert? I have some! 

Let us pray!

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Family Matters

Peninsula Community Church 

Family Matters 

May 6, 2018 

Romans 8:12-17 So then, brothers, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live according to the flesh. For if you live according to the flesh you will die, but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live. For all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God. For you did not receive the spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received the Spirit of adoption as sons, by whom we cry, “Abba! Father!” The Spirit himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God, and if children, then heirs—heirs of God and fellow heirs with Christ, provided we suffer with him in order that we may also be glorified with him.

When we speak of family I am sure that we all have different opinions and ideas about what that looks like. For some of us, our family experience was a positive one. For many, the family experience provided the foundation we needed to be the man or woman we are today. I am also aware that the opposite is true. For some, the family experience has not been as positive as it could be. As a result, we have been negatively impacted by our families. For some, it was not the entire family, but one family member that seemed to create problems in the home and thus made it hard to celebrate family. Regardless of our background, family matters and family really matters to God. 

Throughout the New Testament, there are many Scriptures that point to the family and being the children of God. In this passage, Paul makes a wonderfully powerful statement. For all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God. For you did not receive the spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received the Spirit of adoption as sons, by whom we cry, “Abba! Father!” 

In our passage, Paul reminds us that we do not owe the flesh anything. Because we are sons, we are free from slavery. We must take care that we do not reconnect with the slavery of the past. Regardless of what you think about Kenye West, he made a powerful statement this past week.  He stated that “Slavery is a choice.” He was not talking about historical or institutional slavery but the mindset of slavery. You see what we set our minds on, will control us. If we focus on being slaves, our identity becomes one of slavery. The issue here is that the flesh will continue to attempt to extract a huge debt from us, but it is a debt that we no longer owe. It is a debt that can never be fully paid, as the flesh wants more and more. The flesh keeps raising the debt ceiling so that the debt becomes impossible to pay.

Paul also reminds us that through the Spirit we have become sons of God. We are a part of His family. This week, I read that God does not call us to do something without empowering us to do what He calls us to do. In this case, we are called to be sons of God and we are empowered by the Holy Spirit to do just, be sons of God. We were slaves to sin, but now we are the adopted son’s of God. It is our adoption that seals the deal for us and sets in place the work of the Holy Spirit within us. For a few moments let us look at this idea of adoption. 

During the times of the Romans and at the time of Paul’s writing, adoption was a common practice. By definition adoption refers to the legal action by which a person is taken into one’s family as a member of the family with full rights and authority as a member of the family. The one that is adopted is granted all of the rights and privileges of a true child of the new father. When we understand the act of adoption, we find that it is filled with grace, mercy, and love. For the believer, adoption is one of the most beautiful and rich theological concepts of Scripture.

According to Roman law, the father had ultimate power over a son and for that matter a daughter. That power never ended regardless of the status of the son as an adult. The son was always under the authority and power of the father. He had absolute power and he controlled the family absolutely. It is interesting to note however that by Roman law, if a man saw a son that he wanted to adopt, he had to go through a formidable process to adopt the son. 

The Roman law required a two step process. The first step was “mancipatio.” From here we get our word emancipation. This act of mancipatio was a symbolic sale of sorts. One father would approach the other father with the desire to adopt his son. Once they agreed, the two fathers would meet in a public place and transact business. The son’s father would sell the son to the adopting father and then he would buy him back. This would occur twice. On the third time, the father would not buy the son back. The deal was struck. With that, the control of the father was broken. Once this occurred the adopting father would go the Roman magistrate and present a legal case for the transference of the adopted one to the new father. When completed the adoption was final. 

Notice the spiritual implications of this. The flesh, the enemy of our soul, had control over our life. We were completely controlled by the flesh. The flesh, because of sin, had been given authority and control over our life. But one day, Christ made the case that He wanted to adopt us as His children. Through the cross, Jesus publicly bought us and finalized the adoption. He gave Himself as the price of adoption so He could adopt us by the power of the Spirit. 

When it comes to Roman adoptions there were a few principles that applied. These principles are critical to our understanding of the work of adoption in our life as believers. First, the adopted person lost all of the rights he had with his previous family and the previous father had no rights to his son. While he gave up the old family, He now had all of the rights and privileges of his new family. He was now considered to be a fully legitimate son in the new family. 

We have been adopted by God, and we are His children thus the enemy has no right to rule over us or to control us. We lost all of the rights once associated with our previous family. Now, we have all of the rights and privileges of our new family. We are not illegitimate children, we are fully and completely His children. It is for that reason that we are not in debt to the flesh any more. Listen to Paul’s words in Galatians 3:25-26, But now that faith has come, we are no longer under a guardian, for in Christ Jesus you are all sons of God, through faith.

This leads us to the second thought. The adopted child is a full heir to his new father’s estate, even if there were other sons who were born into the family. The adopted child was an inalienable identified heir of the father’s fortune. Because of our adoption, we are now full heirs to our Father’s estate. Notice, the passage states we are not just heirs, we are joint heirs with Christ. We have a great inheritance. So often we think of an inheritance as property and other assets. With our spiritual inheritance, we inherit eternal life, but more than that we inherit God Himself. The greatest gift is that we get to live in the presence of God for an eternity. In the Old Testament, there are no less than five occurrences where Scripture tells us that God is our inheritance (Numbers 18:20, Deuteronomy 10:9, Deuteronomy 18:2, Psalm 16:5, and Lamentations 3:23-25).  

Thirdly, the old life of the adopted person was completed wiped away. If the son had debts, those debts were cancelled. All records were wiped away as if that person never existed before. The adopted person was regarded as a new person entering into a new life with no past. When we are adopted by God, every sin and debt is wiped away. That is why we do not live as the condemned. Our past record has been wiped away, just as if we never existed before. That is why Paul says that we are new creations in Christ (2 Corinthians 5:17; Galatians 6:15). That is why we do not lived as condemned men nor do we owe a debt to flesh.

Fourth, in the eyes of Roman law, the adopted person was literally and absolutely the son of his new father in every sense. So it is with Christ. We are not partial children. We are full blown, complete sons of God. Galatians 4:4-7 But when the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons. And because you are sons, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, “Abba! Father!” So you are no longer a slave, but a son, and if a son, then an heir through God.

In the movie Ben Hur there is a scene that illustrates this idea of adoption. It is a beautiful scene that shows Arrius adopting Judah as his son, which made him a freedman, a Roman citizen, and Arrius’s heir. All of the rights of the family were given to Judah Ben-Hur. To view this go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DbHDk6Uzri4. 

Finally, while other children were born into the family, adopted children were chosen to be a part of the family. As an adopted child, we were deliberately chosen. I am reminded of one adoptee who thought for years that his family had rejected him, but one day he was reminded that he may have been rejected by one family but he was chosen by another. Christ chose to adopt us. He chose to accept us into His family. We are the preferred choice of God. On the basis of free and voluntary election, God chose us to be His sons. That should excite our hearts. The living, powerful, awesome God has chosen us to be His children. We were not just born into the family, we were chosen by God to be His family. 

Because of our adoption we cry Abba Father. In the Aramaic and Greek languages these were the most passionate words for Father their were. They were intimate beautiful words of love and adoration. As His children today we look into His eyes and cry Abba Father, Daddy God. As the adopted one’s we can now call Him our Father. 

For an audio of this message go to http://pccministry.org/media.php?pageID=14

Copyright © 2018 All Rights Reserved Robert W. Odom

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Flesh VS Spirit 

Peninsula Community Church 

April 29, 2018 

Flesh VS Spirit 

Romans 8:3-9 For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do. By sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin, he condemned sin in the flesh, in order that the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit. For those who live according to the flesh set their minds on the things of the flesh, but those who live according to the Spirit set their minds on the things of the Spirit. For to set the mind on the flesh is death, but to set the mind on the Spirit is life and peace. For the mind that is set on the flesh is hostile to God, for it does not submit to God’s law; indeed, it cannot. Those who are in the flesh cannot please God. You, however, are not in the flesh but in the Spirit, if in fact the Spirit of God dwells in you. Anyone who does not have the Spirit of Christ does not belong to him.

Last week we talked about not being condemned by our past failures and issues. We discussed the fact that we are free from sin and from the past as a result of the work of Christ on the cross. This week we will continue to look at how this transpires and how we can be assured that we are no longer condemned. From our discussion last week, we found that Romans 8:1 tells us that we are free from the guilt of sin, while Romans 8:2 tells us that we are free from the power of sin.

As we will see today, our mindset makes all of the difference and our focus will determine where we go and what we do. Our focus will determine what we will achieve or not achieve in life. Notice that in our passage today, we find that the law was weak because of the flesh. Therefore, if our focus is on the flesh we will fail to be what God has called us to be. We will be guided by a law that is weakened by the very flesh that we focus on. 

To understand this, we must recognize that the law was weakened by the flesh for two reasons. First, the law was weak as it is an outworking of the flesh that drives us to do things that we do not desire to do, and we do not do what we should do. It is the carnal nature that is the focus of Paul’s words in Romans 7. Let me explain what is meant by the flesh. The flesh is that part of us that recoils when we try to do what is right. It is that part of us that came alive when man sinned and disobeyed God in the Garden of Eden. From that time until now, it is the part of us that is at war with God’s desires for us and the purpose of the Spirit within us.

As I was preparing for this message I came across this. We know the work of the flesh in us when, like the disciples, we should be watching and praying, our flesh really wants to sleep. When we should be sleeping, our flesh finds Facebook browsing and catching up on email fascinating. When we should be diligently teaching our children (Deuteronomy 6:7), our flesh would love to watch a relaxing, family-friendly movie. When we should be meditating on Scripture, our flesh becomes a fountain of ideas for reorganizing the room, improving the yard, or critiquing political candidates. When we should be focusing on our work, our flesh brings up that focus-dominating fear and what we could be doing for fun. When we should be cutting our calories, our flesh demands a sugar-laced snack. When we should be eating because we have become undernourished due to believing the lies about how our weight relates to our value, our flesh screams shame-filled things to stop us. When we should be relishing the joy and freedom of sexual purity and fidelity, our flesh desires to imagine or view defiling, lewd images. When we should be humbly resisting premature conclusions regarding a potentially offensive concern or comment, our flesh immediately turns defensive and suspicious, proposing fantasy scenarios that will indulge sinful anger with a feeling of righteous indignation. Have you ever experienced that? Do you know how that feels? That is the struggle of the flesh.

The second reason the law was weakened by the flesh is that the law had no power to bring change. It could guide us, it could teach us, and it could point out sin, but it could not give life. It was powerless to bring peace, and it was powerless to help us please God. The law could tell us what is wrong, but it could not bring change. Have you ever had that person in your life that loved to point the wrong in your life and uncover your failures, but were unwilling to aide in changing or overcoming those issues? That was the problem with the law. It pointed out sin, but it did nothing to relieve it. 

The one positive thing that came from the law is that it taught us we need a Savior. It taught us that following the rules alone is not good enough. We need a Savior. It taught us that towing the line is not productive, because we fear failing and coming up short, which happens when we try to follow the legalism of the law. We can do all of the right things and still fall short of what was intended. We need a Savior. 

That is why Paul’s next statement is so powerful. By sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin, he condemned sin in the flesh, in order that the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.  Notice that Christ came in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin in order to accomplish what the law could not do. The law required righteousness. The law required us to tow the line. The law required us to keep in step.

The law had a requirement for righteousness which could not be fulfilled any way but through Jesus Christ. That is why He who knew no sin took on all of our sin past, present, and future. He fulfilled the righteous requirements of the law. What the law could not do, God did by sending His Son. At first glance, we might miss the depth of this statement. God sent His Son. This meant that He existed before. He is eternal and came to earth to save that which was lost. 

What we know is that the righteous requirement of the law was fulfilled in Christ. We are now empowered to follow Christ through the power of the Holy Spirit. The law could not defeat sin; it could only detect it. Only Jesus can defeat sin, and He did just that through His work on the cross. The question then is is where will we focus our attention? What will we set our minds on? Will we focus on the spirit or will we focus on the flesh? By focusing on the flesh we become obsessed with the rules and the dos and don’ts and we miss living life. We will be focused on just getting by, rather than living life to the fullest. By focusing on the flesh, we miss the opportunity to walk in freedom. On the other hand, if we focus on the spirit, we live in freedom and power. 

Why is this? For the mind that is set on the flesh is hostile to God, for it does not submit to God’s law; indeed, it cannot. Those who are in the flesh cannot please God. As Paul noted, the flesh is hostile to God. It does not submit to God’s law because it cannot. In the flesh it is impossible to please God. That was the plight of Paul in Romans 7, but it is his victory in Romans 8. 

With that in mind let me make an observation or two. We must remember that the fruit of the Spirit is not produced through legislation but by what the vine is connected to. That is why we must be in Christ. That is why we cannot legislate morality, but we must live a spirituality that comes by living a life fully connected to Christ. How many have ever passed a fruit tree and have heard it groaning and moaning to produce fruit? That is not the case at all. That is because fruit is produced from the connection it has to the vine. It does not worry about its fruit, it just stays connected. So are you connected? How do we connect? 

For the guys who were at the men’s retreat this year you might remember Garret Barbush’s message. At the close of his message, he gave us some perspective into how we can set our minds on the spirit and stay connected which leads to bearing the fruit of the spirit. First, we must be confident of our position in Christ. In John 10:10 we find that a full life is a contented life. It is a life of balance. Jesus came to be our life, so you can make a difference as a believer. If we do not remain in Him, we will not be fruitful and we will not make a difference. Instead, we will be tempted to live by the flesh and not the spirit. As believers, we are in Him and we should rest in that.

Second, be aware of God’s desire to be in constant fellowship with you. We will abide in Him only as we are aware that He wants to abide with us. We know this because He chose us. In John 15:16 we find that “He chose us to bear fruit in us.” He chose us to bear fruit and we do that best when we are in fellowship with Him. The result is that we keep our minds set on Christ. 

Third, be intentional about spending time with God. In Matthew 22:36-37 the question is asked about what is the greatest commandment? How do we love God with all of our heart and soul? If we were loving God the way He wants, we will be changing culture. We will be bearing fruit because it is the defining mark of a believer. We must spend time together. We do this through prayer and solitude. 

Fourth, be in God’s word so we get to know Him. We are ineffective without His word. Without His word, we fail to understand what He wants for us. Without His word, we are left to our own demise. Without His word, we become disconnected and discontented. 

My challenge today us to take the next 30 days and focus fully on the Spirit. Spend time in the Bible and in prayer so that we become more connected to Christ. At the end of the thirty days report back and let me know how you are doing. My guess is that you will find that you are doing much better than you hoped or thought. 

For an audio of this message go to http://pccministry.org/media.php?pageID=14

Copyright © 2018 All Rights Reserved Robert W. Odom

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No Condemnation

Peninsula Community Church 

April 22, 2018

No Condemnation 

Romans 8:1-2 There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life has set you free in Christ Jesus from the law of sin and death.

If I polled this room I am sure that I would find that most of us have dealt with regret, failures from the past, and the condemnation resulting from sins committed and those already forgiven. If you are like me, when you look back over your life, you are keenly aware of things you wish you could have done differently. I often wish I could go back and raise my kids now with the wisdom I have obtained through the years. Unfortunately, it does not work that way. For some of us, there are jobs we wish we had taken. There are jobs we wish we had not taken. There are decisions we wish we had made and some we wish we had not made. There are words that have been spoken but there are also words which were never spoken that haunt us.

In Romans 7, Paul describes this battle by painting a picture of the struggle of human life. Paul masterfully describes a life in chaos. As you read Paul’s words in Roman 7:15-20, we are captured with the pressure he is experiencing. Listen to his own words. For I do not understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate. Now if I do what I do not want, I agree with the law, that it is good. So now it is no longer I who do it, but sin that dwells within me. For I know that nothing good dwells in me, that is, in my flesh. For I have the desire to do what is right, but not the ability to carry it out. For I do not do the good I want, but the evil I do not want is what I keep on doing. Now if I do what I do not want, it is no longer I who do it, but sin that dwells within me. Through this turmoil he reached the conclusion that he was a wretched man as noted in Romans 7:24.

The term wretched is interesting in that it means “to bear a callus.” It can also mean “to be exhausted through intense labor.” The bottom line is this word represents an intense miserableness. It represents the condition of the heart and mind when the believer is weary of the fight to do what is right. It represents the struggle to fulfill the requirements of the law in an attempt to be pleasing to God. In fact, how intense and ineffective it is to try to live this way? How painful it is to fail to do or not do what we desire over and over again? It can be frustrating and debilitating. 

From here Paul makes a desperate plea. Who will deliver me from this body of death (Romans 7:24)? Paul reached the point that so many reach. He is saying I am tired and I am weary. There is an annoying reality that is hanging over me. No matter how hard I try, I fail at doing what is right and honorable before God. I keep blowing it. How am I going to get past this? How am I going to get to the place that who I spiritually and who I am in the flesh is in alignment with God’s will and purpose? How can I overcome the plight of my life? How will I ever be accepted by God? 

The disservice of our modern translations of the Bible is that we have chapter and verse designations, which at times can break up a discussion. You see, Romans 8 is a continuation of all of the previous chapters as well as the discussion in Romans 7. In Romans 8:1, Paul makes a powerful life changing statement. He proclaims There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. This is an interesting passage. To understand it, we must dig a bit deeper. 

The first thing to consider is that in the original Greek language it was common for writers to place the most important word at the beginning of the sentence. In our English language the first word is “therefore.” In the original Greek, however, the word “no” comes first. The word used here is not the normal word for no but is the strongest word in the Greek language for “no.” The statement then is an emphatic NO to condemnation. It is like saying, “There is no condemnation, none whatsoever, for the believer in Christ Jesus.”

Secondly, we must understand why the power of condemnation is so destructive. Condemnation has been defined as a statement or expression of very strong and definite criticism or disapproval. Condemnation negatively impacts the believer’s outlook on life in many ways. It reminds us of our past failures and indiscretions. Condemnation gives the false sense that there is no hope and that is just how things will be. There is no dispute on the truth of the accusation per se, but it is how the truth is used that makes the difference. One way brings hope, the other  brings despair. Condemnation also causes us to feel rejected by people and disenfranchised from God. The result is that we walk in guilt and fear and somehow we believe that we have failed ourselves and/or God. Condemnation can also force us into a lifestyle of works rather than living in grace. We are falsely drawn into the attitude that if we just strive harder, God will love us more. 

Thirdly, this passage reminds us of a powerful truth. The idea of no condemnation does not come as a result of our actions but rather our position in Christ. It is not how we act, but where we are positionally that counts most. We are in Christ. That is our position. That is how we need to live. We are in Christ and not under the bondage of past sin. Notice that Paul states the power of living without condemnation comes only to those who are in Christ Jesus.

This truth is critical to our success as the Spirit points us to a life in Christ, because He has delivered us from the power of sin. Paul asks who can deliver him from this body of sin (Romans 7:24)? Who can satisfy this longing to live holy and righteously? It is Christ! It is His death on the cross that paves the way. It is His resurrection that brings power to overcome the sin in us. 

I love what John Piper said in relationship to being in Christ. Being “in Christ Jesus” is a stupendous reality. This stupendous reality of in Christ Jesus brings many benefits. If you are “in Christ” listen to what it means for you. In Christ, you were given grace before the world was created (2 Timothy 1:9). In Christ, you were chosen by God before creation (Ephesians 1:4). In Christ, you are loved by God with an inseparable love (Romans 8:38-19). In Christ, you were redeemed and forgiven for all your sins (Ephesians 1:7). In Christ, you are justified before God and the righteousness of God is imputed to you (2 Corinthians 5:21) . In Christ, you have become a new creation and a son of God (2 Corinthians 5:17, Galatians 3:26). In Christ, you have been seated in the heavenly places, even while living on earth (Ephesians 2:6). In Christ, all the promises of God are Yes for you (2 Corinthians 1:20). In Christ, you are being sanctified and made holy (1 Corinthians 1:2). In Christ, everything you really need will be supplied (Philippians 4:19). In Christ, the peace of God will guard your heart and mind (Philippians 4:7). In Christ, you have eternal life (Romans 6:23). And in Christ, you will be raised from the dead at the coming of the Lord (1 Corinthians 15:22). All those united to Adam in the first humanity die. All those united to Christ in the new humanity rise to live again.

The question therefore is will you live a Romans 7 life or a Romans 8 life. Will you live with the torment of a condemned life or will you live a condemnation free life?  How does this work? It is by grace, but we must act by faith to secure our walk in Christ. By faith, we choose to live in Christ. We choose to walk in His ways. The decision for us is whether or not we will we walk according to the flesh or according to the Spirit. These expressions bring out a strikingly essential distinction between the law and the work of Christ. The former seeks to control and discipline conduct by requirements and threats which brings condemnation. The latter introduces into man’s inner being a new principle of life, where right conduct spontaneously flows from the Spirit. Coercion is the focus of the one and inspiration is the focus of the other.

As I was preparing for this study, something hit me that I had not seen before or at least I did not remember it. The chapter begins with “no condemnation” and ends with “no separation.” I love this thought. The chapter begins with the concept that there is no condemnation when we are in Christ. The chapter ends with the fact there is nothing that can separate us from the love of Christ. In between these two great truths we have the unfolding of truths that help us live as effective, passionate followers of Christ to maximize our purpose in the kingdom. 

In our discussion there is a secondary and equal point that needs to be made. When we speak of no condemnation and the principle that God’s love never ceases, we must also be aware that this does not mean that sin will not be dealt with or judged by God. Too often, we believe in the premise that since there is no condemnation we are allowed to do whatever we want without regard to the consequences. That is hyper grace and should not be given any room or merit in this discussion. Those who hold to hyper grace believe we can do whatever we want to because we are under grace. This is the exact issue that Paul dealt with when asked the question earlier in Romans. “Shall we continue to sin that grace may abound” (Romans 6:1)? His answer was an emphatic no. You see there are consequences to our sin and that must be considered before any decision is made or action taken. Yes we live by grace, but we must not cheapen the grace given to us by thinking we can sin and get away with it. Dietrich Bonhoeffer had this to say about cheap grace. Cheap grace is the grace we bestow on ourselves. Cheap grace is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance, baptism without church discipline, communion without confession… Cheap grace is grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus, living and incarnate. That is not what Paul is talking about here. He knows that God’s grace brings us to repentance and healing and does not free us to live in our sin.

We can live in freedom because there is no condemnation for past sin and failures. At the same time, if we blow it, there is nothing that can separate us from the love of God. Remember Paul’s words. Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword (Romans 8:35)? We can be assured there is no outside influence that can keep us from God’s love. God’s love is not exhaustive and it never ends no matter what. The fact is there is nothing you can do to stop God from loving you. If He already loved us at our worse, why would He start now. He loved us while we were yet sinners (Romans 5:8), why would He not love us when we do something as a believer. 

For an audio of this message go to http://pccministry.org/media.php?pageID=14

Copyright © 2018 All Rights Reserved Robert W. Odom

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Empowered for the Mission

Peninsula Community Church

April 15, 2018

Empowered for the Mission

Acts 1:6-11 So when they had come together, they asked him, “Lord, will you at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?” He said to them, “It is not for you to know times or seasons that the Father has fixed by his own authority. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.” And when he had said these things, as they were looking on, he was lifted up, and a cloud took him out of their sight. And while they were gazing into heaven as he went, behold, two men stood by them in white robes, and said, “Men of Galilee, why do you stand looking into heaven? This Jesus, who was taken up from you into heaven, will come in the same way as you saw him go into heaven.

I love this passage. I love the fact that the Bible does not hide the difficulties and the lack of understanding the disciples exemplified in regard to the mission of Christ. Last week we discussed the issue of having a crisis of faith. Once again, here in this passage, the disciples seemed to fall short in their understanding of the purpose and plan of Christ. They continued to have the false understanding that Christ was going set up an earthly kingdom ruled by political aggression. 

The problem is that they did not comprehend that their timeline did not match Christ’s timeline. So it is with us, our timeline does not always match God’s timeline either. The disciples failed to understand this as they were still concerned about the events that were to come. They in essence wanted it to happen now, while God’s plan was something much different. This was in part because they were still struggling to face the truth that Jesus was not living up to their idea of what they thought He should do. It was a problem then and it continues to be a problem today when we try to force Jesus into our box, or into doing what we think He should be or do. While they continued to debate these issues, Jesus continued to remind them that He did not do anything outside of the will and authority of the Father. Therefore, it was His timeline and not theirs.

I am reminded that God has a timeline for your life as well. No matter what you are walking through, He will see you through every situation. The problem for us is that we are confined to time, as time as we know it, was created for us as created beings. That is why we want God to do things now, or at least by Friday. For that reason, we must be reminded that God does not need time, as we know it. He does not move by chronos time, but rather He moves by Kairos time. 

In the Greek language, in which the New Testament was written, there are two words for time. There is chronos time which is measured by our watches, clocks, calendars, and iPhones. Secondly, there is Kairos time which relates to the right, critical, or opportune moment. When we understand that God is not defined by time, but rather by opportunity and the right moment for His will to be accomplished, we will make the connection that at the right time He will show up. Peter understood this when he stated But do not overlook this one fact, beloved, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day (2 Peter 3:8). Peter understood that at times a day seems like a thousand years and vice versa. 

In the passage before us today, Jesus reminds the disciples and us that they did not need to know the “when” or “why” as much as they needed to know the “what.” It is the what that changes us. It is the what that focuses us on His plan and purpose. Until the timeline was fulfilled, Christians were called to be witnesses. That is a huge what. This is what He wanted them to do until He returned, which He will in His on time.

In Jesus final words we are called to be witnesses. A witness is one who tells a story about what they know about a person and or an event. We most recognize this when it comes to court and the legal system, especially when one is called to be a witness for the prosecution or the defense. As a witness, they must present the truth they know about a person or an event. When it come to being a Christian witness, we tell the truth about Jesus. Witnesses testify to what they know is truth and that which is real. Listen to this exchange “And one Ananias, a devout man according to the law, well spoken of by all the Jews who lived there, came to me, and standing by me said to me, ‘Brother Saul, receive your sight.’ And at that very hour I received my sight and saw him. And he said, ‘The God of our fathers appointed you to know his will, to see the Righteous One and to hear a voice from his mouth; for you will be a witness for him to everyone of what you have seen and heard. And now why do you wait? Rise and be baptized and wash away your sins, calling on his name’ (Acts 22:12-16).

The disciples certainly had much to share about Jesus. They had a story to tell. As we see in the balance of the Book of Acts, they told that story. It was and is the story of redemption. They were preaching and teaching about the work of Jesus and His saving power and grace. We see this in particular with Peter, Paul, and Stephen. Every opportunity they had, they related the story of the work of Christ to those with whom they encountered. The result was changed lives and the expansion of the church and His Kingdom.

Secondly, witnesses have experiences to share. The disciples had watched as Jesus healed the blind, touched the lepers, made the lame to walk, and He reached out to those undeserving of the grace of God. They saw how Jesus had knelt in the sand and how He rebuked the Jewish leadership, that were ready to stone Mary Magdalene for adultery, when they themselves were dealing with their sins perhaps those which were just as serious in nature. He released her with the command to go and sin no more. Not only had they witnessed Jesus heal and give grace to those who did not deserve it, they also experienced the amazing grace of God, personally. After all, these were the same disciples who had rejected Christ. They were absent from the events at the cross. They ran to hide in fear, doubt, and desperation. But, when Christ rose, He came to them so they would know He loved them, had a plan for them, and accepted them right where they were. They knew His love and they knew His grace. They had much to share. Throughout their ministry together, Jesus forgave them and continued to accept them as His disciples even though they failed, they sinned, they judged others, they walked in doubt, and they never fully understood Jesus.

Not only did Jesus call them to be witnesses, He also defined the scope of their mission. They were to go into all the world and preach the gospel. While this certainly relates to the world at large, it also refers to the world in which we live. As individuals we may not have the capacity to reach the whole world per se, but we can reach the world we are in and the one God has given us. Wherever we live and whatever sphere of influence we have, we are witnesses of Christ. God has placed you in a community, you have a specific job, you volunteer for various organizations, and so on. We share through our words, our actions, and our attitudes. I can guarantee you that people are watching you and they will know what kind of witness you are. So are you a witness for Christ, or for the persecutor of the people.

Finally, Jesus not only calls us to be witnesses, He not only gives us the scope of our mission, but He also empowers us to accomplish the task we have been called to. Christ promised us that He would fill us with the Holy Spirit and He would empower us to be witnesses. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth. Jesus did not just give them the command to be witnesses. He did not just give them the responsibility to do so, He gave them power to fulfill what they needed to do. They were given the power of the Holy Spirit to fulfill their mission. 

As a kid I loved super heroes. As some of you, I grew up with Batman & Robin, Superman, the Green Hornet, and others. Each of this superheroes either had special powers, or they had unique tools that made them special heroic crime fighters. As believers, we have been given supernatural power to be witnesses for Christ. Unlike the super heroes of yesteryear, we do not need a special costume or a Bat mobile to have power. We have been given a power to accomplish the task we need to do each and every day and at every moment.

So what does this power do? It leads us to truth. To be a good witness we must speak the truth. Even before a witness takes the stand they are sworn to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Listen to the words of John. “I still have many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now. When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth, for he will not speak on his own authority, but whatever he hears he will speak, and he will declare to you the things that are to come. He will glorify me, for he will take what is mine and declare it to you. All that the Father has is mine; therefore I said that he will take what is mine and declare it to you (John 16:12-15).

The Holy Spirit will lead us to truth. He will allow us to speak in the authority of God. He will give us the words to speak when we need them. He will glorify Christ and point to the Father. He will give us all we need to accomplish His purpose in life and ministry. So are you ready? People today need to hear the message of hope that Christ’s brings, so will you share it?  

For an audio of this message go to http://pccministry.org/media.php?pageID=14

Copyright © 2018 All Rights Reserved Robert W. Odom

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Are You Having a Crisis of Faith?

Peninsula Community Church 

Are You Having a Crisis of Faith?

April 8, 2018

Matthew 28:16-20 Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. And when they saw him they worshiped him, but some doubted. And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

This week I have been dealing with this question. After the resurrection what do we do? How do we deal with all that transpired? How do we get past the celebration of the event and move to an ongoing celebration of life? Last week, we celebrated the festivities of Easter, the clothes, and of course all of the food. Last week we had a great service. We focused on the power and the truth of the resurrected Lord. But here is a truth, we do not and we cannot continue to stand at the empty tomb and expect life to change. We must begin to live in the reality of the resurrected Lord. We must move beyond the tomb to live life to the fullest. While this is true, as I was preparing this message, I could not help but focus on the fact that while some worshipped Jesus others doubted. This occurred after His resurrection. It is that doubt that keeps many from moving forward to live a resurrected life.

Our tendency might be to judge or criticize those who doubted. This is so easy to do. In reality, doubt is often a result of difficult circumstances and problems. It is interesting that the word doubt means “to be hung in suspense.” It means that we are at a crossroad of decision making. Decision making can negatively impact us because the results of our decision are unknown or undecided. From a spiritual standpoint, doubt is a place where God seems to be distant or seems to be unaware of what we are going through. It is a place where have more unanswered prayers than ones that have been answered. It is my guess that we have all faced this kind of doubt. We have all encountered issues that seem to have no answers or at least any easy answers. We are faced with trusting God, and the promises of God, because we do not have solid answers and there is no hope found in the circumstances we face. 

For some of the disciples, as well as others, who followed Christ, the events of the last few days and weeks had left them in doubt and struggling with a crisis of faith. They were hung in suspense as to what had happened and what was going to happen. They were hung in the suspense of wanting to have the right answers. They wanted to believe but everything that had transpired for them was a bit more than they could handle. Some of those who doubted agreed with what Christ had done but they struggled with who He was. Others knew who He was, but they struggled with what He had done. Their vision of Christ did not match up to the reality of their heart or the teachings of Christ. What they knew and believed about Jesus had been shaken and now they were struggling to keep everything in perspective, even though He had risen from the dead. You see they were face to face with Jesus, and yet they still had doubts.

We too can face a crisis of faith when the trials we encounter cause us to struggle with prayers that go unanswered. We face the pressure of circumstances that seem to not change or in fact they get worse. This can cause us to be be shaken to the core of our faith. We can even begin to question the validity of our faith. We can begin to question whether or not we have been betrayed by God Himself. We can reason that we are doing our best but He is not doing His part. These unanswered questions nag at our hearts: Is God really who He says He is? Can God do what He says He can do? We have taught others that God is good, loving, and faithful and now we wonder if that is really true.

As we consider one’s crisis of faith, I believe there are some benefits to dealing with a crisis of faith. If we choose to follow God by faith and in obedience to His Word, our crisis of faith will lead us to a deeper understanding of God and who He is. Sometimes we need to choose to follow Him by faith, even when we do not have all the answers much less all of the questions. I love what we find in 1 Kings 18:21. Elijah made this challenging proclamation “How long will you go limping between two different opinions? If the LORD is God, follow him; but if Baal, then follow him.”

The first benefit is that a crisis of faith forces us to take a hard look at what we believe. What a benefit that is. In our humanness, we can become comfortable with a belief system that may or may not be correct. For example, my faith in Christ has been tested many times. There have been times where I have needed a divine intervention from God but it did not seem to be happening. It seemed that He was delaying His answer and that He was not concerned. My faith crisis was in believing that God did not really care. I had the feeling that He had forgotten me? I began to question if I was good enough. When God did answer in His time, my view of God as the faithful One was strengthened, and thus what I believed about God was confirmed. 

Secondly, a crisis of faith leads to more authentic convictions. When we experience a crisis of faith the last thing we need to do to is deny it. Instead of denying the issue, lean into your crisis of faith and face your doubts. As a result, authenticity will be a characteristic of your life. Here is the deal, God knows your doubts already, so you might as well be honest with Him about them. Only when you face the truth about your doubts are you able to move forward toward a more authentic faith. If we allow fear to rule and we deny our doubts, our faith will not be as strong as it should be. God honors truthfulness and He already knows what we are thinking. 

Third, a crisis of faith invites you to a stronger and more deeply-rooted faith. By accepting that we are in a crisis of faith, we have the capacity to admit we need God. Can you imagine the children of Israel standing before the Red Sea? Behind them was an army rushing at full speed toward them. Ahead of them was a river that was impossible to cross with a million people or more. Their leader was an old man who has nothing but a stick in his hand. Do you think they had a crisis of faith? These and other stories have been recorded through Scripture to give us hope and help us to navigate life when doubt comes and we struggle with our own crisis of faith.

When the events we face cause us to believe we cannot go on serving God, what do we do? How do we keep the Easter story alive in our heart? I believe this passage gives us some answers. This may be a different look at this passage than we are use to, but here we go. First of all, we worship. Worship is a key component to living in the reality of the resurrected Christ and moving beyond our crisis of faith. The word worship is a great word. This word comes from the old English word “weorthscipe” which means to ascribe or give value to something or someone. As we give value to something or someone, we tend to worship or value that thing or person. When it comes to Christ, He is already worthy but we must value the gift He has given us. We must ascribe worth and value for who He is and what He is about. 

The second solution is to recognize that we have been called to a higher purpose. Notice that Jesus did not distinguish between the disciples who worshipped Him and the ones who doubted. He called them all with the same purpose and calling. No matter who you are as a believer, He is calling you to find a purpose. This gives us a reason to look beyond where we are and allows us to refocus on something greater than ourselves. Perhaps one reason we are facing a crisis of faith is that we have not determined our purpose in Christ’s Kingdom. 

What does He call us to do? Here Jesus issued this command. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. Notice a couple of things here. First, we are to go. This speaks of action. We are to go people and not wait for them to come to us. To go means we have an outward focus on evangelism. He called them all to go into the world. Let me make a critical point here. We are all called to share Christ with those we encounter. By going our focus is shifted from our struggle with faith to seeing those who need of Jesus and those who need hope for a better day. 

 

The third way to counter our crisis in faith is to remember, He is with us all of the time. He never leaves us. He is, has been, and always will be with us. That brings us hope and inspiration to face a better day. It encourages us to move in obedience to touch those lives we encounter. 

So how are you today? Are you living with a crisis of faith? Are living with doubt? Maybe today God wants to show you are new purpose and a new reason to focus on Him. Maybe today, He wants you to worship Him regardless of where you are circumstantially. What about it? Are you ready to soar with faith?

For an audio of this message go to http://pccministry.org/media.php?pageID=14

Copyright © 2018 All Rights Reserved Robert W. Odom

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The Resurrection is no Joke

Peninsula Community Church

The Resurrection is no Joke

April 1, 2018 

1 Corinthians 15:12-19 Now if Christ is proclaimed as raised from the dead, how can some of you say that there is no resurrection of the dead? But if there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Christ has been raised. And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain. We are even found to be misrepresenting God, because we testified about God that he raised Christ, whom he did not raise if it is true that the dead are not raised. For if the dead are not raised, not even Christ has been raised. And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. If in Christ we have hope in this life only, we are of all people most to be pitied.

This morning we celebrate Easter which is Resurrection Sunday. It is interesting that this particular Easter falls on April 1 which is April Fool’s Day. The last time this occurred was in 1956. That was sixty-two years ago. Easter will not happen on April 1 again until 2029 and after that in 2040. Following that, we will not see Easter fall on April Fool’s Day again this century. The reason for this is that Easter is set as the first Sunday after the first full moon after Spring begins. That is why Easter is on a different Sunday each year.  

Historically, April Fool’s Day has been known as the day we play practical jokes on one another. There have been some interesting practical jokes through the years. One of the funniest for me was when the BBC ran a report that they had found trees responsible for growing spaghetti. In fact, they showed a photo of workers harvesting spaghetti from the trees in order to prove the news story. Following the report, they were immediately inundated with calls from people wanting to know where they could purchase the spaghetti trees and if they could buy them with penne or lasagna. Another interesting one to me was the April Fool’s Day that Burger King offered a left handed whopper for those who were southpaws. They advertised that all of the condiments had been turned 180 degrees to accommodate those who were left handed. 

While we might laugh at these stories, there were some in Jesus’ day, and today as well, who try to classify the story of Christ’s resurrection as a hoax, a joke, or a made up story. But as we will see today, the story of the resurrection is no joke. For a moment, let me review some of the excuses and the reasoning given against the resurrection, and then we will look at the truth of the resurrection, and how we benefit from the greatest miracle ever to occur. 

After the resurrection, some tried to say that Jesus had not actually died, He had just fallen asleep and had passed out due to the severity of His injuries. In their minds, He never rose, because He never actually died. Others suggest that His disciples had stolen the body of Christ and thus made up the story of the resurrection to hide the truth. Another theory proposed is that the disciples and His witnesses so loved Him and were so distraught they actually hallucinated His resurrection. Others suggest the disciples were so overwhelmed with sadness and regret, they only imagined that He had risen. Still others questioned the validity of the witnesses and what they actually saw. If the witnesses could be discredited, then the news of the resurrection could be discredited.

We hear a lot today about fake news but this is not a new idea. This goes back to Jesus’ time where false news stories were being filtered through the town to cover up the truth of the resurrection. The stories go on and on, but these stories beg the question that if these things were true, then why would the disciples put their lives on the line the way they did. To propagate such a lie cost them so much. The message of the resurrected Christ cost them their lives, their homes, and their future. So, why would anyone propagate such a story knowing that it would cost them everything. The reason of course is that this was not a lie, it was the truth and they continued with this message because it was a message of life and hope.

With that said, let me give you three reasons why the resurrection is no joke. First, of all our faith is based in the truth of the resurrection. Paul stated, But if there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Christ has been raised. And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain. Paul tells us that if there was no resurrection then our preaching and our faith is all in vain and is useless.

Here is the fact, by faith and through the preaching of the word, we know life’s disappointments, injustices, and failures can be overcome, because He is alive. Remember the story. On Friday, there was a lack of hope. There was not too much to celebrate. Christ was dead and was now lying in a borrowed tomb. The disciples were filled with regret and fear. Their faith had been shaken. And now rather than being strong and passionate about Christ, they were hiding in the darkness of a closed room. 

But on the third day, He arose and immediately went to the disciples. Why? He wanted to strengthen their faith and refocus then on the mission He had called them to. They did not have to cower in fear, regret, or lost hope any more. They now could walk in faith that is empowered by the risen Lord. 

For us today, because He is alive, we are assured we can have a relationship with Him. You see you can not have a relationship with a dead man. He is alive and wants to come to us. He wants to move us from fear to hope, from regret to promise, and from lost mission and to new assignments. Everything Jesus taught and lived for depended upon his death and resurrection. All the promises and prophecies in the Bible depend on the resurrection. The whole history of God’s plan to restore his relationship with man and woman depends on the resurrection. It is not overstating the fact to say the resurrection of Jesus is the single most important event in the history of the world. Your life and mine depends on it. Thank God it is no joke.

Secondly, the resurrection is no joke because through the resurrection we have power to overcome the work of sin. Paul states, And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. Jesus not only overcame death but He overcame the power of sin. Through the cross we have forgiveness of sin. That is an awesome proposition but we need more than forgiveness, we need deliverance. The resurrection not only reminds of this, but it also paves the way for us to conquer sin. The power of sin can be broken because of the resurrection. 

From the beginning of time the lie propagated by the enemy was that we would die. There is truth to that when we live without Christ. In Christ, however, we do not have to face death, at least like others might. Because of the resurrection, all of the trials and injustices of Good Friday were redeemed! All of  the things that bring us death were redeemed by when Christ rose from the dead. The greatest evil ever done by mankind, the created crucifying the creator, has been redeemed to be the greatest good the world will ever know, the resurrection. Jesus is alive and that makes all the difference in this world! No matter what you experience whether pain, sin, mistreatment, or whatever it might be can be redeemed and be made right. The resurrection is no joke.

Thirdly, the resurrection is no joke because it gives us hope for the future. We have eternal life with Christ. Paul stated Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. If in Christ we have hope in this life only, we are of all people most to be pitied. This life is not it. To believe that suggests that we are to be pitied. Paul is saying it is so sad to believe that there is nothing beyond our life here. So many believe we live and then we die, but we are promised life beyond our current existence. We have a life beyond this world. 

You see while the miracles of the gospels were powerful, they pale in comparison to what is to come to those who are believers in Christ. At times, we can look at this world today and see that there is not much to get excited about. Think about this. Every person who ever received a miracle from Jesus died as we all will some day. His greatest victory was not the miracles He performed, but His resurrection. Miracles are only temporary, but the resurrection gives permanent hope. He comes for us that we might have life beyond this life. 

Too many in the world today do not have hope. A part of the problem is that many tend to only see things through the lens of the present. Others have lost hope and do not trust Christ. But He can and should be trusted. He promised He would rise and He did just that. It is the resurrection that sets Christianity apart from the world’s religions. We serve and celebrate the risen Lord today because He is alive. This also means that when He makes other promises in His word that He will keep those promises.

One of those promises is that if we turn our hearts and lives to Him, He will accept us and receive us. He will move us from hopelessness, regrets, frustration, to having a life filled with hope and peace. That is His mission and that is the work He accomplishes in each of us. 

For an audio of this message go to http://pccministry.org/media.php?pageID=14

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